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Ina Garten Davita

Annales Veteris et Novi Testamenti

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Amber, resins, and a whiff of oakmoss. This smells like old venerable amber. Good throw and wear length.

 

Amber lovers, take note.

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Lovely old-fashioned powdery amber and sandalwood are the dominant notes.  I thought from the context (17th century bible scholarship) that it might be dusty and dry, but the oakmoss means that it’s beautifully balanced between ethereal and earthly. This was a second tier choice for me as some of the decants I wanted were sold out, but I’m enjoying it a lot.

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Someone sent me a partial bottle of this as a gift and I'm very thankful.  This has a lot of my favorite notes in it, but it didn't show up on my radar for some reason.  It's like having a creamy sandalwood that's been dipped in golden resins, with one of the most beautiful drydowns ever.  Whenever I wear this, I keep thinking of frankincense with it's golden, sour-sweet character.  It has a really good, non-powdery, labdanum/amber richness and warmth, on a bed of just slightly earthy, sour, dry, sophisticated oakmoss.  After about 3 hours, this reminds me of some of my favorite shops full of solid resins and old, vanillic books, with a slight, clove-like warmth and spiciness.  I love it and actually don't find it to be too powdery (I strongly dislike it when amber and sandalwood go powdery - this is more creamy and resinous).

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Now this is a perfume that very much conjures an image of an old, grand library, more than most other library based perfumes I've so far come across. In the bottle, this smells overwhelmingly like dust at first. Likewise, when I first put it on dust was a very powerful note, so I was a little unsure how this was going to go. XD The bottle has now aged for a few days and that first note has shifted more to dust and amber, which is a lot more palatable. It really does smell like an aged book, which is pretty neat.

 

As it dries it becomes far more reminiscent of a beeswax candle, warm and soothing, but also aged. This aged quality contains a touch of amber still and possibly oakmoss. I can't comment on the other notes as I'm not familiar with, but there is a depth I can't quite describe, so they could very well be at play.

 

All in all, this is a keeper for me. I really love the atmosphere it captures and the way it's aged so far over a few days. Truly a lovely scent.

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